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Comparison of antimicrobial activity, phytochemical profile and minerals composition of garlic Allium sativum and Allium tuberosum

Abstract

Allium species are considered to be one of the world’s oldest cultivated vegetables. Most commonly used species of garlic in Pakistan and India is Allium sativum, while Allium tuberosum is mainly consumed and cultivated in China, Southeast Asia, and North-east part of India. The present study was conducted to compare the antimicrobial activity, nutritional value and antioxidant profile of Allium sativum and Allium tuberosum. The outcome indicates that Allium tuberosum have slightly higher antimicrobial activity, higher mineral profile, and enriched in antioxidants in comparison with Allium sativum. The highest antimicrobial activity of Allium tuberosum was noticed against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis with 43.9 and 40.7 mm zone of inhibition using 100% extract. Allium tuberosum contains high contents of calcium (28.662±.00mg/100 g), potassium (10.62±0.50) and zinc (59.00±1.00). Allium tuberosum also showed higher antioxidant activity (0.24±0.03 mg vitamin C equivalent (VCE)/g fresh weight in ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, 0.18±0.02 mg VCE/g fresh weight in 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and 1.09±0.12 mg VCE/g fresh weight in 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) assay) in comparison with Allium sativum.

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Correspondence to Nauman Khalid.

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Khalid, N., Ahmed, I., Latif, M.S.Z. et al. Comparison of antimicrobial activity, phytochemical profile and minerals composition of garlic Allium sativum and Allium tuberosum . J Korean Soc Appl Biol Chem 57, 311–317 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13765-014-4021-4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13765-014-4021-4

Keywords

  • Allium sativum
  • Allium tuberosum
  • antimicrobial activity
  • comparison
  • minerals
  • phytochemical assay