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Molecular identification and characterization of Pseudomonas sp. NCCP-407 for phenol degradation isolated from industrial waste

Abstract

Phenol is a toxic pollutant found in effluent of numerous industries and its elimination is a foremost challenge. The utilization of bacteria plays a crucial role in phenol bioremediation. For isolation of phenol degrading bacteria, sample was collected from industrial waste and enriched in mineral salt medium (MSM) contained 300 mg/L phenol. The strain was identified based on 16S rRNA gene analysis as Pseudomonas species and the phylogenetic analysis affiliated the strain with Pseudomonas monteilii (AF064458) as the most closely related species. Phenol tolerance of the strain in MSM supplemented with various concentrations of phenol indicates that the strain NCCP-407 can grow best at 750 mg L−1 phenol. The strain showed complete degradation of 750 mg L−1 phenol in 56 hours when supplement as a sole source of carbon and energy with the average degradation rate of 28 mg L−1h−1. The doubling time was recorded approximately as 12.49 h−1. The present study suggests that this strain is efficient in phenol degradation and can be used in treatment of wastewater containing phenol.

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Correspondence to Iftikhar Ahmed.

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Ahmad, N., Ahmed, I., Shahzad, A. et al. Molecular identification and characterization of Pseudomonas sp. NCCP-407 for phenol degradation isolated from industrial waste. J Korean Soc Appl Biol Chem 57, 341–346 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13765-013-4045-1

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Keywords

  • biodegradation
  • bioremediation
  • industrial waste
  • phenol
  • Pseudomonas
  • 16S rRNA gene